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Three Cambridge professors recognised with Institute of Physics awards

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Professor John Barrow, Professor Judith Driscoll and Professor Henning Sirringhaus have been awarded medals in the 2015 Institute of Physics awards.

Three Cambridge professors have been awarded medals in the 2015 Institute of Physics awards.

Professor John Barrow (Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics) has been awarded the Dirac Medal for his combination of mathematical and physical reasoning to increase our understanding of the evolution of the universe, and his use of cosmology to increase our understanding of fundamental physics.

Professor Barrow is a highly original scientist whose work is concerned with fundamental questions about the origin and nature of the universe. He has been at the forefront of theoretical cosmology for more than 35 years. His research in cosmology is extraordinarily far ranging and he has made important contributions across many areas of gravitation, astrophysics and cosmology. It spans work of a mathematical nature, particle physics, mathematical statistics and observation. Barrow is also a distinguished writer and lecturer for non-specialist audiences. His work in this area has made a huge contribution to public engagement with science.

Professor Judith Driscoll (Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy) has been awarded the Joule Medal for her pioneering contributions to the understanding and enhancement of critical physical properties of strongly-correlated oxides, encompassing oxide superconductors, ferroelectrics, multiferroics and semiconductors.

For more than 25 years, Professor Driscoll’s unique approach to research and technological development has significantly advanced our understanding of attaining enhanced physical properties of a number of strongly-correlated oxides. Notably, Driscoll’s “nanotechnology in a thin film” approach has provided a new route to high-performance electronic materials with outstanding property enhancements.

Driscoll’s international leadership in nanostructured materials has been of essential importance.

Professor Henning Sirringhaus (Department of Physics) has been awarded the Faraday Medal for transforming our knowledge of charge transport phenomena in organic semiconductors as well as our ability to exploit them.

Professor Sirringhaus is a highly creative, versatile and productive physicist who is not afraid to tackle challenging problems. His research crosses the interface between condensed matter physics, materials science and electrical engineering. In several areas of soft matter electronics and opto-electronics research he has carried out landmark investigations which have given birth to stunning new technologies and industries.

See the full list of winners.


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